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The Judiciary Branch officially formed with the passage of the Ho-Chunk Nation Judiciary Act of 1995 on March 22, 1995, but represents a constitutionally created branch of tribal government. HCN Const., art. III, § 2. The Constitution of the Ho-Chunk Nation charges the Judiciary with the application and interpretation of the laws of the Ho-Chunk Nation. HCN Const., arts. IV, § 2, VII, § 4. The Nation's laws consist of the Constitution, legislative enactments, and Traditional Court articulations of custom and tradition, which serve as the basis for the Nation's evolving common law. The Judiciary performs its role within the context of justiciable cases and controversies brought by aggrieved litigants, seeking redress of either past, imminent or ongoing harm. HCN Const., art. VII, § 5(a). Three separate courts comprise the Ho-Chunk Nation Judiciary: Supreme Court, Trial Court and Traditional Court. The Judiciary encourages interest in the judicial process and any resulting public scrutiny or constructive criticism. Consequently, the Judiciary hopes that its web page aids in stimulating such interest while also providing the public with a tool to further delve into the emerging tribal jurisprudence.

10/13/2017

Thank you all for your patience. The Judicial Branch portion of the website is now live. We are currently adding more content as you read this. You will find active links, below, for The Index of Laws, Judicial Forms, as well as Judicial Rules.

We are working with the Supreme Court to add their content as well. Please continue to be patient as we add content. If you are looking for something and cannot locate it, please check back at another time.

Thank You.

Ho-Chunk Nation Judiciary
Wa Ehi Hoci
P.O. Box 70
W9598 Highway 54 East
Black River Falls, WI
54615

Telephone: (715) 284-2722
Tollfree: (800) 434-4070
Fax: (715) 284-3136


*The Court will only accept filings by fax with prior permission from the presiding Judge
CLERK OF COURT AND STAFF ARE NOT ALLOWED TO GIVE LEGAL ADVICE. Legal questions should be directed to your attorney. You may be elgible for legal services from Wisconsin Judicare, who can be contacted at (715) 842-1681 or (800) 472-1638 - Toll Free